2010 Bicycle Plan

In March 2011, the Los Angeles City Council adopted the 2010 Bicycle Plan.  This plan was developed after years of meeting with communities throughout Los Angeles.  It designated backbone, neighborhood, and green bikeway networks for the entire city and in total proposed 1,684 miles of bike facilities in Los Angeles.  The 2010 Bicycle Plan was the City’s most ambitious bicycle plan, following two previous plans from 1977 and 1996.  Today, the Bicycle Plan has been adopted into the City’s Mobility Plan 2035.

Mobility Plan 2035

The Mobility Plan 2035 is an element of the City of Los Angeles’ General Plan. It updates the City’s 1999 Transportation Element and integrates the 2010 Bicycle Plan.

The goals, objectives, policies and programs of the 2010 Bicycle Plan are incorporated into Mobility Plan 2035, which lays the policy foundation necessary for the City to plan, design, and operate streets that accommodate all users including pedestrians, bicyclists, transit riders, and motorists. A few components of the 2010 Bicycle Plan have been modified during the Plan’s integration into Mobility Plan 2035. These modifications were made in order to reflect the latest input from the community, as well as to reflect further refinements of the bikeway system.

Mobility Plan 2035 includes six goals that highlight the City’s mobility priorities. Each of the goals contains objectives (targets used to help measure the progress of the Plan) and policies (broad strategies that guide the City’s achievement of the Plan’s goals). Policies have programs linked to them, which are action items that will implement this Plan.

Mobility Plan 2035 Bicycle Network

Today, the Mobility Plan prioritizes bicycle travel on approximately 1,200 miles of streets and other rights-of-way part of the City’s Bicycle Network. The Bicycle Network is comprised of the Bicycle Enhanced Network (BEN) and the Bicycle Lane Network. The Bicycle Enhanced Network consists of Bicycle Paths, Protected Bicycle Lanes (Cycle Tracks), and Priority Neighborhood Enhanced Network connections, while the Bicycle Lane Network is made up of Bicycle Lanes.

Bicycle Paths

Bicycle facilities outside of the roadway, such as the Los Angeles River bicycle path, will a facilitate off-road bicycle travel for approximately 150 miles.

Protected Bicycle Lanes (Cycle Tracks)

Since the 2010 Bicycle Plan, there has been increasing interest for the City to establish a network of Protected Bike Lanes, or Cycle Tracks, that provide physical separation from vehicular traffic for people traveling by bike. The Mobility Plan 2035 addresses this demand by proposing approximately 300 miles of Protected Bike Lanes on City roadways as a subset of the Bicycle Lane Network. Based on streets identified as part of the Backbone Network in the 2010 Bike Plan, these streets will receive substantial bicycling infrastructure including cycle tracks, bicycle signals, and demarcated areas to facilitate turns at intersections.

Enhanced Neighborhood Streets

On select neighborhood serving streets (totaling 50 miles) part of the Priority Neighborhood Enhanced Network, that provide critical connections within the Cycle Track system (formerly part of the Neighborhood Network) where installing a Cycle Track is not feasible, bicycle-friendly countermeasures will be prioritized. These streets will typically receive such treatments as mini-roundabouts, cross-street stop signs, crossing islands at major intersection crossings, improved street lighting, bicycle boxes, and bicycle-only left turn pockets.

Bicycle Lanes

Part of the Bicycle Lane Network, Bicycle Lanes will be located on arterial roadways with striped separation. A subset of these lanes are proposed to receive treatments to physically separate bicycle travel from vehicular travel. See Protected Bike Lanes (Cycle Tracks).

Plan Archive

Think Bike L.A.

On September 22 – 23, 2011, with the guidance of Dutch bicycle experts, three working groups consisting of City staff and members of the public got the chance to be a part of the ThinkBike L.A. Workshop. During the workshop, each working group re-imagined the City of Los Angeles as a place designed to make riding a bicycle feel safe and comfortable.

Materials from the workshop are available, in the links below, for view and download:

2010 Bicycle Plan

In March 2011, the Los Angeles City Council adopted the 2010 Bicycle Plan.  This plan was developed after years of meeting with communities throughout Los Angeles.  It designated backbone, neighborhood, and green bikeway networks for the entire city and in total proposed 1,684 miles of bike facilities in Los Angeles.  The 2010 Bicycle Plan was the City’s most ambitious bicycle plan, following two previous plans from 1977 and 1996.  Today, the Bicycle Plan has been adopted into the City’s Mobility Plan 2035.

Mobility Plan 2035

The Mobility Plan 2035 is an element of the City of Los Angeles’ General Plan. It updates the City’s 1999 Transportation Element and integrates the 2010 Bicycle Plan.

The goals, objectives, policies and programs of the 2010 Bicycle Plan are incorporated into Mobility Plan 2035, which lays the policy foundation necessary for the City to plan, design, and operate streets that accommodate all users including pedestrians, bicyclists, transit riders, and motorists. A few components of the 2010 Bicycle Plan have been modified during the Plan’s integration into Mobility Plan 2035. These modifications were made in order to reflect the latest input from the community, as well as to reflect further refinements of the bikeway system.

Mobility Plan 2035 includes six goals that highlight the City’s mobility priorities. Each of the goals contains objectives (targets used to help measure the progress of the Plan) and policies (broad strategies that guide the City’s achievement of the Plan’s goals). Policies have programs linked to them, which are action items that will implement this Plan.

Mobility Plan 2035 Bicycle Network

Today, the Mobility Plan prioritizes bicycle travel on approximately 1,200 miles of streets and other rights-of-way part of the City’s Bicycle Network. The Bicycle Network is comprised of the Bicycle Enhanced Network (BEN) and the Bicycle Lane Network. The Bicycle Enhanced Network consists of Bicycle Paths, Protected Bicycle Lanes (Cycle Tracks), and Priority Neighborhood Enhanced Network connections, while the Bicycle Lane Network is made up of Bicycle Lanes.

Bicycle Paths

Bicycle facilities outside of the roadway, such as the Los Angeles River bicycle path, will a facilitate off-road bicycle travel for approximately 150 miles.

Protected Bicycle Lanes (Cycle Tracks)

Since the 2010 Bicycle Plan, there has been increasing interest for the City to establish a network of Protected Bike Lanes, or Cycle Tracks, that provide physical separation from vehicular traffic for people traveling by bike. The Mobility Plan 2035 addresses this demand by proposing approximately 300 miles of Protected Bike Lanes on City roadways as a subset of the Bicycle Lane Network. Based on streets identified as part of the Backbone Network in the 2010 Bike Plan, these streets will receive substantial bicycling infrastructure including cycle tracks, bicycle signals, and demarcated areas to facilitate turns at intersections.

Enhanced Neighborhood Streets

On select neighborhood serving streets (totaling 50 miles) part of the Priority Neighborhood Enhanced Network, that provide critical connections within the Cycle Track system (formerly part of the Neighborhood Network) where installing a Cycle Track is not feasible, bicycle-friendly countermeasures will be prioritized. These streets will typically receive such treatments as mini-roundabouts, cross-street stop signs, crossing islands at major intersection crossings, improved street lighting, bicycle boxes, and bicycle-only left turn pockets.

Bicycle Lanes

Part of the Bicycle Lane Network, Bicycle Lanes will be located on arterial roadways with striped separation. A subset of these lanes are proposed to receive treatments to physically separate bicycle travel from vehicular travel. See Protected Bike Lanes (Cycle Tracks).

Plan Archive

Think Bike L.A.

On September 22 – 23, 2011, with the guidance of Dutch bicycle experts, three working groups consisting of City staff and members of the public got the chance to be a part of the ThinkBike L.A. Workshop. During the workshop, each working group re-imagined the City of Los Angeles as a place designed to make riding a bicycle feel safe and comfortable.

Materials from the workshop are available, in the links below, for view and download: