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Bicyclist Anti-Harassment Ordinance Ready for City Council

We here at the LADOT Bike Blog just heard from our sources in City Hall that the precedent-setting Bicyclist Anti-Harassment Ordinance will go before the full City Council sometime in the next two weeks.  Many bicyclists can relate harrowing stories of an out-of-control driver assaulting them simply for being on the road, and the ordinance scheduled to come before City Council aims to give bicyclists a tool to fight back against the daily harassment to which many have been subjected.  With the coming vote at the California State Legislature for the “Give Me 3” legislation, July is shaping up as a huge month for LA bicyclists.

Bicyclists from all over Los Angeles, all over Southern California, and all over the country should keep their eyes on this groundbreaking ordinance and support the City’s decision to provide bicyclists with tools to protect themselves on the road.

Turn out support this month to help LA join the vanguard of bicyclists' rights

This landmark piece of legislation wouldn’t be here today if it weren’t for CD 11 Council Member Bill Rosendahl.  It was CM Rosendahl who introduced the council motion directing the City Attorney to craft the anti-harassment legislation, and it was CM Rosendahl who helped shepherd the legislation through the Transportation Committee on its way to full City Council. Read more

“Give Me 3” Passes Assembly Transportation Committee

We have some great news to pass on to you since we last reported on “Give Me 3” compliments of the California Bicycle Coalition! By a 8-5 vote, the State Assembly Transportation Committee passed “Give Me 3” (SB 910). Next up, the bill will head over to the Assembly Appropriations Committee for further consideration. Thanks to the bicycle community’s strong support (over 200 people contacted committee members to express their support for the legislation), “Give Me 3” overcame opposition from automobile and trucking interests and is now a step closer to becoming state law. For more on the SB 910’s passing the State Assembly Transportation Committee and for the latest on “Give Me 3” (SB 910), be sure to check out the California Bicycle Coalition’s official Give Me 3 website.

Notice for July BPIT, 7/5/11: Educational Programs, Bicycle Friendly Streets, and More Bike Lanes

Next Tuesday, July 5th, will see the next meeting of the Bike Plan Implementation Team (BPIT).  Here is the agenda for the meeting. BPIT meetings are held, as always, from 2:00-3:30 in room 721 in City Hall.

This month represents a slight shift in the direction of the BPIT, both in terms of topics discussed and in terms of the decision process for new projects. If you want to help shape the schedule and priorities for the next stage of bike plan implementation, it’s incumbent that you attend July’s meeting. If you aren’t able to make it out to the meeting, leave your comments below and LADOT Bike Blog will make sure they get into the hands of City Planning.

Among other items, the BPIT will discuss the Safe Moves bicycle education program

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Bicycle Facilities and Safe Routes to School

In previous generations, the majority of school aged children either walked or biked to school. Children got more physical activity, our streets were less congested, and our air quality was better. Fast forward to 2011: less than 15 percent of children living within a two-mile radius either walk or bike to school. A vast majority are either driven by parents or taken to school by bus. Increased traffic and safety concerns have made it inhospitable for many children to bike or walk to school.

Safe Routes to School

Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Programs were created to reverse these trends. SRTS can fund infrastructure and/or programs that improve safety and encourage walking and bicycling. Projects emerge through a collaborative effort between parents, schools, community members and local government. One of the key steps in determining potential partner schools is based on need.  A new mapping tool from the Safe Transportation Research and Education Center (SafeTREC) has been a huge help this year in determining where to prioritize SRTS efforts in the City of Los Angeles. (Below is a map developed by SafeTREC of pedestrian and bicycle collisions near school sites in central LA between 2006 and 2008. )

Los Angeles, Central City pedestrian or bicycle collisions

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“Give Me 3” Bill SB 910 Needs Your Support

The 3-foot passing bill SB 910, sponsored by State Senator Lowenthal (D – Long Beach),  has recently passed through all the state legislature committees necessary to come before the full California State Assembly. Though this is wonderful news, there is still much work to be done. For a 3-foot passing law to become law, it will need the vocal support of bicyclists from all over the state.

Give Me 3

Give Me 3 could soon be state law (courtesy waltarrrrr)

Covered extensively last week by Streetsblog, the legislation has gone through a few revisions to garner the political support needed to get to this phase.  Despite the changes made, this is still a worthwhile piece of legislation that will help to keep bicyclists safe on the streets of California.  Previous attempts at adopting a 3-foot passing law in the State Assembly have failed before, and we should hardly let the perfect become the enemy of the good when we have the opportunity to save lives on our streets.  3-foot passing legislation has been adopted by many states across the country, and it is high-time California follows suit.

In his acceptance of the Golden Spoke Award at the Blessing of the Bicycles during Bike Week LA, Mayor Villaraigosa touted SB 910 and the City’s role in bringing this legislation to the State Assembly.  He also exhorted bicyclists from around the state to get in touch with their state representatives to show support for the bill.  The vote is certain to be a close one, and SB 910 will need all the support that the LA bicycle community can muster.

When SB 910 is agendized for the State Assembly, LADOT Bike Blog will be sure to update you in time for you to contact your representatives.

Anatomy of a Bicycle Friendly Street: Signage

(Ed Note: Most information on Bicycle Friendly Street treatments come from the Technical Design Handbook in the 2010 LA Bike Plan.  Though we are happy to present it in bite-sized pieces, we highly recommend you download it yourself and have a good read.  You can download the Technical Design Handbook here.  For a refresher on what a Bicycle Friendly Street is -also called a Bike Boulevard- you can read our introductory post here. You can also find previous posts on chicanes, round-a-bouts, loop detectors and other BFS treatments here

The LADOT Bike Blog hopes everyone had a nice Bike Week LA 2011. To commemorate this year’s  “Bike Friendly LA” theme, the LADOT Bike Blog continues its ongoing series detailing the specific treatments that go into making a Bicycle Friendly Street (BFS) – a big part of LA’s bicycle friendly future.

Today, we will take a look at the Traffic Control Device (TCD) known as signage. Signage is considered a “Level One” BFS application based on its relatively low level of physical intensity. It is important to note that BFS applications are site-specific, and that not all streets require the highest application treatments. The Bike Plan Technical Design Handbook (TDH) recommends gathering community input along with the necessary engineering and design work to determine the level of application necessary for each individual street.

CA MUTCD-approved signage

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“Give Me 3” Legislation Makes it on State Legislature Agenda

Legislation meant to improve bicyclist safety statewide has cleared another hurdle towards passage.  S.B. 910, sponsored by Senator Lowenthal (D – Long Beach), made it onto the state’s legislative agenda early this month at literally the 11th hour.  It will now go before various committees, the State Senate Transportation and Housing Committee being the first on May 3rd, before coming to the floor for a vote.

Unvieling "Give Me 3" last summer (via LACBC)

S.B. 910 is the legislative result of the “Give me 3” campaign launched last summer by Mayor Villaraigosa, LADOT, LAPD, LACBC, and Midnight Ridazz.  Because the only way to get a 3-foot passing law in Los Angeles is to first change the California Vehicle Code (CVC), the Mayor’s Office began seeking out a legislative sponsor to bring a 3-foot passing law to the California State Assembly.  That sponsor came in the form of Long Beach’s State Senator Alan Lowenthal, a long-time supporter of bicyclists and bicyclists’ rights.  A special thanks also goes out to the California Bicycle Coalition, who teamed up with the Mayor early in the process to champion this legislation for bicyclists’ rights at the state level. Read more

cicLAvia Stories: Share Yours With Us!

LADOT Bike Blog had a great time at cicLAvia this past Sunday.  We were up bright and early downtown to catch the Mayor’s press conference in Little Tokyo, and then we spent much of the day tooling back and forth between Boyle Heights and Koreatown.
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Anatomy of a Bicycle Friendly Street: Chicanes

(Ed Note: Most of the information on Bicycle Friendly Street treatments in this post  comes  from the new Bike Plan’s Technical Design Handbook.  Though we are happy to present it in bite-sized pieces, we highly recommend you download it yourself and have a good read.  You can download the Technical Design Handbook here.  For a refresher on Bicycle Friendly Streets generally–read our introductory post here.)

An example of a chicane from Austin, TX

It’s time for yet another installment in our ongoing series that details the specific treatments that go into making a Bicycle Friendly Street (BFS). Today, we will examine chicanes – a traffic calming device. Traffic calming devices are considered “Level Four” BFS applications based on level of physical intensity. It is important to note that BFS applications are site-specific, and that not all streets require the highest application treatments. The Bike Plan Technical Design Handbook (TDH) recommends gathering community input along with the necessary engineering and design work to determine the level of application necessary for each individual street. In case you were wondering, there are five different application levels – varying from signage to traffic diversion. Read more

Bicyclist’s Anti-Harassment Ordinance Clears T-Committee – Next Stop: City Council

Yesterday at 2:15 PM, the City Council’s Transportation  Committee met to discuss, among other things, a possible Bicyclist Anti-Harassment Ordinance.  The draft of the ordinance, released last month to great fanfare, was the result of a motion introduced by Council Member Bill Rosendahl.  The hearing yesterday at the Transportation Committee was the first hurdle on the draft ordinance’s path to becoming law.  It was fitting, then, that the selfsame Council Member Bill Rosendahl sat today as Chair of the Transportation Committee to hear the ordinance which he had introduced.

One step remains for the ordinance to become law

With a few adjustments, the draft ordinance cleared Transportation Committee and is now on it’s way to being agendized for the full City Council.  You can check out the play-by-play at the twitter hashtag #TComm. If adopted by City Council, the ordinance becomes law.
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