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Northvale Gap Closure Open House Summary

Thanks to all who came by last month to comment on this project as we reach the halfway mark in our design process! We appreciate the valuable feedback from neighbors and bike path riders.

The Northvale Gap Closure project aims to close a 0.7 mile gap in the existing Expo Line Bike Path with a new bikeway between Motor Ave and Overland Ave. The resulting project will provide a safe, low-stress bicycle facility through Cheviot Hills and Rancho Park, and help complete a continuous east/west bikeway network from Santa Monica to USC/Exposition Park.

During the open house held on June 26th, 2018, City staff from LADOT, the Bureau of Engineering, and Council District 5 provided community members with updates on the project’s current design. (The materials from this meeting can be found here). Attendees were encouraged to provide their general feedback on the project, as well as vote on their preferred design option for Segment 2 (Dunleer Dr. to Putney Rd.) of the project.

The vast majority of the 27 written comments received at the open house or via email expressed support for the project. The comments featured several recurring themes:

Parking: Most commenters supported the proposal to eliminate parking on the south side of Northvale Rd between Dunleer Dr and Putney Rd in order to accommodate the new bikeway.

Signal on Motor Avenue: Many commenters were in favor of the proposed pedestrian and cyclist signal at the future bike path entrance on Motor Ave, noting that that the current configuration for turning left onto Northvale Rd from Motor Ave was unsafe.

Segment 2 Design: We asked attendees to vote on their preferred option for the street-level segment. Option 1 was two-way on-street bike lanes separated from vehicular traffic by bollards. Option 2 was a two-way bike path on raised curb with wood posts and cable railing. Many preferred the aesthetics of Option 2 (as portrayed in the preliminary rendering below). Others mentioned that Option 2 feels more “separated from vehicular traffic,” which would make the path safer to use. Based on this feedback, the project will develop the design for Option 2, which has a more visible separation from motorized traffic and will help keep cyclists safe.

Access Points: While most commenters supported Option 2 for Segment 2, many of them wanted openings along the path in order to access it from adjacent streets. Those in favor of Option 1 (on-street bike lanes with bollards) preferred this design because it allowed path users to enter or exit the path at multiple points. For Segment 1 (Motor Ave. to Dunleer Dr.), a few comments expressed concern about the access point on Walavista Rd., citing “security concerns”.

Thank you once more to all who came to the June 2018 open house and shared their thoughts with us! As we finalize the design, we will take into account the suggestions, including those on safety and access points. Continue checking the blog for updates on this project as it moves forward.

Open House: Expo II Bike Path – Northvale Gap Closure

Our June 2018 open house for the Expo II Bike Path – Northvale Gap Closure Project was a big success! Over 50 people came to check out design updates, ask questions, and offer feedback on the project. For those who weren’t able to attend, feel free to look through the PDF of the presentation boards linked below. We are still accepting comments via email – please send to Charlie Ho (charlie.ho@lacity.org) by Friday, July 6th.

Stay tuned for our upcoming post with a summary of community feedback on the project!

June 26 Open House Presentation Boards: Expo II Bike Path – Northvale Gap Closure

Expo II Bike Path – Northvale Gap Closure Fact Sheet – June 2018

 

Cruising the Coast: A Two-Wheeled Tour of San Pedro

Bicycle tourism has been well observed and practiced as a recreational activity across the United States, but often we fail to remember the multitude of sightseeing opportunities right here within our city’s diverse neighborhoods.  As Los Angeles’ bicycle network and multi-modal connectivity expands, we have more and more opportunities get out of our cars and explore new areas by bicycle. There’s no better way to spend a sunny Sunday than exploring Los Angeles’ hidden gems. We thought we would share our favorite bicycle routes and points of interest in and around San Pedro, one of L.A.’s most scenic and bikeable neighborhoods.

Cruising the Waterfront 1

Clockwise from top left: The Corner Store, view from Paseo Del Mar looking north; bike lane signage; Metro Bus 246; palms at Point Fermin Park; Point Fermin Lighthouse; and buffered bike lanes on Paseo Del Mar.

Located 25 miles south of Downtown L.A., San Pedro is home to some of the city’s most breathtaking vistas and historical sights, not to mention bike lanes and paths that even novice riders will enjoy. Our journey begins on San Pedro’s Paseo Del Mar, accessible via the terminus of Metro Bus 246 at Paseo and Parker St. Cruise Paseo’s bike lanes and check out the breathtaking cliff-side views of the Pacific and Catalina Island. Stop by local haunt, the Corner Store to refuel with coffee and snacks before making your way east to Point Fermin Park, home of legendary Walker’s Café and the Point Fermin Lighthouse, built in 1874.

Cruising the Waterfront 2

Taking in the view on Paseo Del Mar.

From Point Fermin, it is a quick 5 minute ride down Shepherd and Pacific Avenues to Cabrillo Beach, where you can check out the Cabrillo Marine Aquarium and the nearby tide pools. If squids and urchins aren’t your thing, enjoy the views along the beachfront bike path and fishing pier. Head north on sharrowed Shoshean Road toward 22nd Street where twenty-second Street Park’s scenic bike path will lead you straight to Crafted at the Port of Los Angeles, San Pedro’s new artisan marketplace located in a beautifully restored warehouse.

After picking up some homemade marmalade, head up the hill to Beacon St. to check out the Muller House Museum (open Sundays only), a cherished jewel of San Pedro’s past. Other great sights in the vicinity include: the WPA murals in the San Pedro Post Office on Beacon St,  recently constructed Cabrillo Way Marina and Warehouse No. 1 at the south end of Signal St, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Cruising the Waterfront 3

Clockwise from top left: Warehouse No. 1; view from Signal St., bike parking at the Red Car Downtown Station, bike lane on Harbor Blvd., a glimpse of the Bike Palace on Pacific Ave., the Merchant Marine Memorial and Maritime Museum off Harbor Blvd. Center: A brand new boardwalk just north of the Maritime Museum.

Take a well-deserved break at Utro’s Cafe right off of Sampson Way, home to arguably the best burger in town. Peruse Utro’s extensive collection of memorabilia to learn a bit about the history of longshore workers in San Pedro. If you’re still up for more San Pedro sights after lunch, take a stroll around the quaint shops at Ports O’Call. From here you can also take the short trip north to the fantastic Battleship USS Iowa and Los Angeles Maritime Museum both accessible via the bike lanes on Harbor Blvd.

If you want to give your legs a rest, hop on the Historic Waterfront Red Car Line, one of the last remaining vestiges of Los Angeles’ railcar past or enjoy the water show at Gateway Plaza, featuring two Fanfare fountains by WET Design. When you’re ready to catch the 246 back north, take bike-friendly 9th, 13th, or 14th Streets 4 blocks west to Pacific Ave.

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Since there’s so much more to see in San Pedro – like the Warner Grand Theater and Korean Bell, just to name a few- feel free to leave us your suggestions for other great bike-friendly sights in town! Also, let us know if you have any suggestions for other bikeable L.A. neighborhoods you would like to see us explore on the blog.

More great resources for your trip: Bike Palace (located on Pacific Ave. and 16th St.); bicyclela.org (for bike maps and parking info)

123 Miles of Bikeways Installed Since the Adoption of the 2010 Bike Plan

123 miles is about the distance from Los Angeles City Hall to downtown San Diego. Mayor Villaraigosa announced February 21st that it is also the number of bikeways installed by LADOT since the beginning of Bicycle Plan implementation in March 2011. The rate of 61 miles every 12 months is almost eight times as fast as in the last 40 years.

A list of the mileage completed so far this fiscal year can be found here:

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As the year moves forward, LADOT will be focusing on adding additional bicycle lanes, more bicycle parking, several bicycle path construction projects, sharrowing more than 22 miles of roads, and installing Bicycle-Friendly Street infrastructure on 4th Street.

We’d like to thank the leadership of Mayor Villaraigosa and the City Council, as well as the city’s many bicycle advocates, for helping to make Los Angeles a more Bicycle Friendly Community.

LADOT Bike Program – Bike Lane Projects Update, 7/5/11

The LADOT Bike Blog hasn’t done a projects update in quite a while, so we figured it was about time to take stock of which new projects are on the pavement and which projects we can expect to see in the near future.  Quite a few bike lanes have been laid down in the last few months, and we’ve got plenty more lined up for construction.  As always, LADOT relies on the support of the public and the council offices to build new bicycle infrastructure.  If any of the pending projects are in your neighborhood, please contact your council member and let them know you support bike lanes.

Come below the fold, and we’ll cover a few of our newest developments.  This update by no means covers all the projects we’re working on (some haven’t progressed to the next step on the road to construction), so feel free to check out our Bike Lane Projects page, our Bike Path Projects page, and our Year Zero/2010-2011 Projects Map to see everything we’re working on.

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LA River Bike Path Section Closed May 25th For Repairs

Just a quick heads-up for the LA bicycle community: a section of the LA River Bike Path will be closed tomorrow for repairs. The northernmost part of the LA River Bike Path, from Zoo Drive in the north to Los Feliz Boulevard in the south, will be closed all day on Wednesday May 25th and scheduled to re-open Thursday May 26th.

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The northern terminus of the LA River Bike Path

Pavement & Railing Repair

The all-day closure is being done to repair breaks in the railing along the river and to repair pavement on the bike path in poor condition.  While no one likes having the LA River Bike Path closed, I think we can all agree that a smoother and safer ride is worth a single day of closure.

LA River Bike Path 1C: History in Elysian Valley

Many of us celebrated the  opening of the Elysian Valley segment of the LA River Bike Path last year with a good amount of hoopla and ceremony. This newest section of the bike path runs through Elysian Valley, going 2.58 miles from Fletcher Drive to Barclay Street – near where the 5 Freeway connects with the 110.  In engineer-speak, this section of the bike path was labeled “1-C”.  The next section on the LA River, which will connect all the way to Downtown with bike path and bike lanes (Phase 3) , is currently in early design stages.

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The grand opening of the Elysian Valley bike path in December

LADOT Bike Blog was certainly guilty of being overly optimistic about the opening date of Phase 1C.  Back in the salad days of LADOT Bike Blog, we predicted 1C opening in late April of 2010Oops.  That predicted opening itself was a delay of the original opening date set for January 2010.

This wasn’t, however, the first delay for Phase 1C.  The Elysian Valley section of the LA River Bike Path seems to have been born under an unlucky star.  Come with us as we go through the history of Phase 1C.

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Update: Metro Orange Line Extension Bike Path

The opening of the Metro Orange Line BRT in the fall of 2005 greatly expanded mobility options for the notoriously auto-centric San Fernando Valley. The original 14 mile leg that stretches from Warner Center to North Hollywood has been a big success, surpassing Metro’s own 2020 ridership goals in just seven months.

Running beside the busway for a majority of its length is the Orange Line bike path – a Class I bicycling facility (a small section on the busway’s extreme eastern end has Class II bike lanes). According to the LA City Bike Plan, Class I facility’s are “ideal for novice riders and children, recreational trips, and long distance commuter bicyclists of all skill levels who prefer separation from traffic.”  The bike path has also been a big hit and has helped Valley residents realize the value of investments in adequate bicycling and pedestrian facilities.

Picture taken shortly after the openning of the Orange Line Bike Path

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Bike Maps Across the City: LADOT Delivers

As mentioned here and elsewhere, the LADOT Bike Program has recently completed a long-overdue update of our LA City Bike Maps.  As part of getting these maps out to the public, I get to mail out maps (free to you) and each coordinator gets to drops off boxes of new maps all over the City at bike shops and bike co-ops.  This approach makes plenty of sense: Members of the public who are most likely to want a bike map are also those members of the public most likely to visit bike shops and bike co-ops.

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Pallets full of bike maps in the depths of LADOT's storage area

The coordinators have delivered so many maps, in fact, that we only have enough Valley Bike Maps left to mail out to people submitting map requests.  This past week, I rode along with coordinator Brendan Keeler and intern Derek Levoit, delivering bike maps across downtown and the westside.

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Two Can’t-Miss Meetings for LA’s Bike Community this Week

There was much hoopla last week over the adoption LA’s ambitious and visionary bike plan.  Now it’s time to take that momentum and use it towards getting work done today for the benefit of all LA’s bicyclists.  Two events this week should be of especial interest to the bicycle community: The BAC Planning Subcommittee meets Tuesday afternoon and the City Council Transportation Committee meets Wednesday to discuss the bicyclist Anti-Harassment Ordinance.

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Advocates, City Staff, and Electeds celebrate the Bike Plan's adoption

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