LADOT: Sharrows installed on Adams Blvd.

We’ve officially hit the 2/3 mark on LADOT Bikeways’ pilot project Sharrows. Installation of new Sharrows took place this weekend along West Adams Boulevard from South Figueroa Street to South Vermont Avenue, adding just under 1 mile of new Sharrows.

New Sharrows connect to the Hoover Bike Lanes

LADOT Bikeways staff set down the markers for the Sharrows before installation. As usual, they measured 12 feet out from the curb.

Adams Boulevard is a tough stretch of road to deal with when looking to implement Sharrows. There are sections of red curb, peak-hour lanes, and stretches of the road with T.A.N.S.A.T. signs. All of these things preclude us from laying down Sharrows, as we can only place them beside parallel parking spaces. It leaves a stretch of Adams, just west of Figueroa, Sharrows-free. The upside is that LADOT Bikeways was able to remove (with the support of Council Districts 1 and 8) some peak-hour signs along Adams, turning them into full-time parking spaces which made it possible to install Sharrows.

Notice anything missing?

After the first few hundred feet of frustration, however, it’s smooth sailing. Once they begin, the Sharrows extend, uninterrupted, all the way to Vermont Avenue.

It's like the Sharrows just go off into the horizon...

The Sharrows on Adams have the potential to be a very beneficial connector in the neighborhood. Both Figueroa and Vermont are major bus routes. The Sharrows along Adams will be able to connect bus-riding bicyclists to the 1.4 mile stretch of Bike Lanes on Hoover from Venice to Jefferson.

On the Corner of Hoover & Adams

It goes almost without mention that the Adams Sharrows are also in close proximity to USC and a very high concentration of bicyclists. LADOT Bike Blog has often seen, as a student at USC, many fellow students riding their bikes around campus or on the Hoover bikes lanes, but rarely anywhere else. By increasing the bicycle infrastructure around the university, there may be a greater chance that students will choose to bicycle to their destination rather than drive. Finally, the Adams Sharrows also go right past the Hoover Recreation Center.

Now accesible via Sharrow

Taking photos while riding around Adams, LADOT Bike Blog saw quite a few other bicyclists out and about. But similar to our experiences on Reseda, many of these riders were using the sidewalks. As more riders and drivers get used to Sharrows, we’ll hopefully see these bicyclists take their rightful place on the roadway in a safe manner.

And, as always, you can check out all of our photos from Adams on our Flickr page.

Only two more pilot sites left! Ride safe out there.

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0 replies
  1. bikerdude
    bikerdude says:

    The sharrows are a first step to recognizing that bicycling is a true transportation option for the City of Los Angeles. But bicycle Boulevards and bike lanes would make for safer road ways for bicyclist and pedestrians. It good the city is getting cyclist out of the risk of being “doored” by someone getting out of a parked car. But to be honest I’m concerned about being “mirrored by a motor vehicle passing by within a foot or two.
    I’m hopeful motorist will start respecting bicyclist on the street by seeing more and more bicycle facilities’ on the road and then recognize bicyclist have the same right to be on the road as cars.
    I’m, reading the new bike plan and if the City Council truly supports this plan, LA will have very good bicycle facilities on the road. Please keep pushing the bicycle agenda forward from the inside and I will continue to write the mayor and city council members. Together we will make a positive change for bicyclist.

    Reply
    • ladotbikeblog
      ladotbikeblog says:

      Thanks for the comment, bikerdude.

      Part of the pilot project study we’re conducting observes how drivers interact with bicyclists while they’re riding in the center of the Sharrow. Depending on the results that we get, we’ll be able to make recommendations on the positioning of Sharrows that will encourage drivers to pass bicyclists safely.

      Reply
  2. bikerdude
    bikerdude says:

    Actually, I rode Reseda over the weekend and I felt like I had enough room not to be “doored” and the motorists slowed down and passed me with more then three feet. I wasn’t concerned about getting “mirrored” with the sharrows.
    In general I’m more concerned about being “mirrored” then” doored” on the streets.
    So in my book the sharrows worked, I hope the pilot program shows that and the city puts more in. As I said the more motorists see bicycle facilities on the street the safer the roadways will be for bicyclists.

    Reply
    • ladotbikeblog
      ladotbikeblog says:

      That’s good to hear, as Reseda has the widest curb-lane width (travel lane + parking lane) of all our pilot project sites. With a really wide curb-lane width, there’s always the chance a driver will try to “squeeze through” the lane instead of merging to pass.

      Reply
  3. Vlggrngrl
    Vlggrngrl says:

    I was thrilled to see the sharrows on Adams Blvd.! Hopefully they will be expanded in all directions and connect with the bicycle path that will be built alongside the Expo Line. I agree with bikerdude that the “more motorists see bicycle facilities on the street the safer the roadways will be for bicyclists.”

    Reply
    • ladotbikeblog
      ladotbikeblog says:

      The 5 year plan calls for a pilot project along S. Figueroa from Expo Blvd. to downtown in 2011 and converting Adams from Fairfax to Vermont into a Bicycle Friendly Street in 2014. You can look at the 5 year plan maps and the descriptions and street limits of each project at the LA Bike Plan website.

      Reply

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  1. […] new Civic Park, but where’s the Bike Station? Even Berkeley is getting one, already. LADOT is now 2/3 of the way through their sharrows pilot project; not all sharrows are on the streets, though. Flying Pigeon […]

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