LA County Sidewalk Riding: Part 4

So far, LADOT Bike Blog has covered the rules for sidewalk riding in LA, the County, the Valley, north county, west county, and the beach/beach-adjacent towns of the south bay.  Today, LADOT Bike Blog will cover the cities and towns of the Harbor Corridor.

Long Beach has some pretty innovative infrastructure, but what about their sidewalks?

(Ed. note: Before we get started, let’s just make clear that all the same disclaimers from Part 1 still apply.  Good?  Good.)

(Ed. note 2:  Props to Los Angeles Transportation Headlines for picking up all 4 parts of our series so far.  They’re a great clearinghouse for all LA transportation news and we highly recommend becoming a regular reader.)

Long Beach:

Long Beach doesn’t allow sidewalk riding in a business district (which, as we’ve covered earlier in the series, is pretty expansively defined by CVC 240).  Long Beach also has some thorough, albeit sensible, directives for those riding on the sidewalk.  Sec. 10.48.070:

A. No person shall ride a bicycle upon a sidewalk within any business district; upon the sidewalks of bridges; in pedestrian underpasses; on pedestrian overpasses; upon sidewalks adjacent to any school building, church, recreation center, playground, or senior citizens’ residential development; within the area south of Ocean Boulevard between the Long Beach Museum of Art on the west and Bluff Park on the east; on the northerly side of the Downtown Marina mole which directly abuts said marina, between Gangway A and Gangway P.

B. Any person riding a bicycle upon a sidewalk shall yield the right-of-way to any pedestrian, and when overtaking and passing a pedestrian, shall give an audible signal and shall pass to the left of the pedestrian only under conditions permitting such movement in safety.

C. The speed limit for bicycles on a sidewalk is fifteen miles per hour unless otherwise posted. The speed limit where pedestrians are present is five miles per hour. Signs specifying the speed limit shall be placed by the Traffic Engineer in locations which will provide notice to significant concentrations of sidewalk bicycle riders or where bicycle speed problems are found to exist on sidewalks.

D. For purposes of this Section, the following public ways shall be considered sidewalks:

  • 1. Seaside Walk south of Ocean Boulevard between Fifty-fifth Place and Sixty-ninth Place, known as the Boardwalk;
  • 2. Bay Shore Walk north of Ocean Boulevard between Fifty-fifth Place and Sixty-ninth Place.

So be mindful when you ride on the sidewalk in Long Beach.  But with all that awesome bike infrastructure on the street, who would want to ride on the sidewalk anyways?

Signal Hill:

Notwithstanding sidewalks, Signal Hill actually prohibits bicycle riding on some streets.  Sec. 10.52.020:

It is unlawful for anyone to ride a bicycle on Hill Street between Obispo Avenue and Temple Avenue, or on Cherry Avenue between 21st Street and 25th Street in the city.

But what about sidewalks?  Well, while Signal Hill doesn’t have any specific language prohibiting bicycles from the sidewalk, they do have specific language prohibiting skateboards and rollerskates from certain sidewalks(Sec. 10.56.030).

Carson:

Sidewalk riding, as with many cities in LA County, is prohibited in “business districts”.  Sec. 3244.2:

No person shall ride a bicycle on any sidewalk in a business district. Any person riding a bicycle on a sidewalk in any area where riding is permitted shall yield the right-of-way to any pedestrian.

Carson also reserves the right to prohibit sidewalk riding elsewhere if signage is posted (Sec. 3244.3).

Compton:

Hidden in the chapter for “Police Regulations”, Compton doesn’t allow sidewalk riding in a very small area.  We’ll let Sec. 7-24.2 tell you:

b.         It is unlawful for any person(s) to use or operate any bicycles, skateboards, or rollerskates upon or in any sidewalk, street, or other City owned property designations in the following locations:

  1. Compton Civic Center Plaza
  2. Compton Boulevard from its intersection point with Willowbrook Avenue to its intersection point with Acacia Avenue.

Paramount:

LA County’s traffic code (Title 15) was adopted by the City of Paramount.  Sec. 29-1 says:

Title 15 of the Los Angeles County Code, entitled “Vehicles and Traffic,” being a code regulating traffic upon public highways, is hereby adopted by reference as the Traffic Code of the City.

As we know from earlier installments of “LA County Sidewalk Riding”, LA County forbids bicycle riding on the sidewalk.

Lynwood:

Lynwood does not allow sidewalk riding.  Sec. 3-3.7:

Operation On Sidewalks: No person shall ride a bicycle on the sidewalks of the City.

South Gate:

More of the CVC’s “business district” restrictions in South Gate, but with a few additional rules.  Sec. 8.10.020 says:

A.    Riding on Sidewalks. Bicycles may be ridden on all sidewalks at a speed not to exceed five miles per hour, except the following:

  1. Sidewalks within a business district
  2. Sidewalks adjacent to any public school building when school is in session
  3. Sidewalks adjacent to any recreation center when in use, or any church during services
  4. Any pedestrian overcrossing or other sidewalk where prohibited by posted signs.

B.    Director to Designate Prohibitions. The director may designate and declare certain portions of any sidewalk to be prohibited for bicycle use.

C.    Director to Post Prohibitions. The director is authorized to erect and maintain signs adjacent to sidewalks designating prohibitions on the use of bicycles.

D.    Yielding Right-of-Way. Whenever any person is riding a bicycle upon a sidewalk, such person shall yield the right-of-way to any and all pedestrians. A person riding a bicycle upon entering a roadway or driveway from a sidewalk shall yield to all traffic.

Bell Gardens:

Sidewalk riding in Bell Gardens has some interesting language.  Sec. 13.04.030 says:

No person shall ride or park or leave a bicycle upon any sidewalk at any time in a business district (C or M zones), and no person shall ride a bicycle on a sidewalk outside a business district except when, because of the nature of the conditions on the roadway, it would be hazardous to ride in the roadway, at which time it is permissible for a bicycle to be ridden on the sidewalk providing that such would not endanger or hinder the movement of pedestrians thereon. The rider of a bicycle upon a roadway shall ride as nearly as practicable within five feet of the right hand curb or edge of the roadway except when passing a standing vehicle or making a left hand turn at an intersection.

So sidewalk riding is prohibited in business districts, but only in C and M zones rather than the CVC definition of “business district”.  Additionally, sidewalk riding is prohibited elsewhere unless “it would be hazardous”, similar to Gardena’s sidewalk riding rules.

Cudahy:

Cudahy, sadly, does not have their municipal code available online.  As such, LADOT Bike Blog cannot advise you on the legality of sidewalk riding there.  If you happen to snag a copy of their municipal code, let us know.

Maywood:

Maywood is one of the few cities that doesn’t have any language specifically dealing with sidewalk riding.  If you’d like a crack at their municipal code, take your best shot.

Bell:

The City of Bell, much like Cudahy, does not have a copy of their municipal code available online.

Huntington Park:

Again, “Business District” is the word, though the City of Huntington Park has decided to define that term themselves.  Sec. 4-7.801.1:

No person shall ride or operate a bicycle upon any public sidewalk in the Central Business District, as such area shall be defined by City records from time to time, except where such sidewalk is officially designated as part of an established bicycle route. Pedestrians shall have the right-of-way on sidewalks.

While nothing in the municipal code specifically defines the “Central Business District”, it looks to be on and around Pacific Boulevard in Huntington Park.

Vernon:

Like a few other Harbor Corridor cities, Vernon does not have a copy of their municipal code available online.

Commerce:

At first, Commerce looks to have similar language to LA, which would mean legal sidewalk riding. Sec. 10.36.080:

No person shall operate or ride a bicycle, skateboard, scooter, inline skates or other similar contrivances upon any sidewalk, street, alley, parkway, walkway or parking area in a manner which endangers the safety of any person or property, or restricts the movements of pedestrians and/or motorists.

But Commerce hedges their allowance of sidewalk riding with a few restrictions.  Sec. 10.36.090:

Any public sidewalk in front of or adjacent to any public building or walkway, parkway or public ways or easements maintained for the purpose of ingress, egress and passage of the public, including:

  • (a)City Hall and City Hall North Annex;
  • (b)Public libraries;
  • (c)Transportation service center;
  • (d)City parks, except for those areas of the park designated for skateboarding as provided for in Chapter 9.50;
  • (e)Senior citizens center; and
  • (f)Teen center.

Montebello:

Montebello is another city that does not allow sidewalk riding.  Sec. 10.64.040:

No person shall ride or park or leave a bicycle upon any sidewalk. The rider of a bicycle upon a roadway shall ride as nearly as practicable within five feet of the right-hand curb or edge of the roadway except when passing a standing vehicle or making a left-hand turn at an intersection.

Monterey Park:

Monterey Park must have really liked Montebello’s municipal code, because they reproduced the municipal code language on a sidewalk riding prohibition word for word.  Sec. 10.60.070:

No person shall ride or park or leave a bicycle upon any sidewalk. The rider of a bicycle upon a roadway shall ride as nearly as practicable within five feet of the right-hand curb or edge of the roadway except when passing a standing vehicle or making a left-hand turn at an intersection.

Now that we’ve wrapped up the Harbor Corridor, let’s go to the big board!

Sidewalk Riding is allowed

  • LA City (except Venice Boardwalk and posted business districts)
  • West Hollywood (with extra rules)
  • Burbank (though it’s still unclear)
  • Redondo Beach (unless there are signs)
  • Commerce (with extra rules)

Sidewalk Riding is not allowed

  • LA County
  • Inglewood
  • Santa Monica
  • Palmdale
  • Westlake Village
  • Malibu
  • Calabasas
  • Manhattan Beach (unless you’re under 14)
  • Lawndale
  • Hawthorne
  • Gardena (unless you feel unsafe on the road)
  • Rancho Palos Verdes
  • Paramount
  • Lynwood
  • Bell Gardens (never in a business district, only allowed elsewhere if road is “hazardous”)
  • Montebello
  • Monterey Park

Sidewalk Riding is not allowed in “business districts”, among other rules

  • Glendale
  • Beverly Hills
  • Culver City
  • Agoura Hills
  • San Fernando
  • Santa Clarita
  • Lancaster
  • El Segundo
  • Hermosa Beach
  • Torrance
  • Lomita (with signage, after approval of the City Council)
  • Long Beach
  • Carson
  • Compton
  • South Gate
  • Huntington Park

No Clear Language in the Municipal Code

  • Hidden Hills
  • Avalon
  • Palos Verdes Estates
  • Rolling Hills Estates (lacking sidewalks)
  • Rolling Hills (no sidewalks at all)
  • Signal Hill
  • Cudahy (no municipal code available online)
  • Maywood
  • Bell (no municipal code available online)
  • Vernon (no municipal code available online)

0 replies
  1. Joseph E
    Joseph E says:

    “It is unlawful for anyone to ride a bicycle on Hill Street between Obispo Avenue and Temple Avenue, or on Cherry Avenue between 21st Street and 25th Street in the city.”

    What?! Can Signal Hill really prohibit the operation of bicycles on public streets? These two streets are really steep; do they want us to ride on the sidewalk downhill? There is no good alternative to Cherry for over 1/2 mile to the east, and Walnut (1/4 mile west) is also pretty steep.

    I imagine this ordinance is unenforced, but perhaps I should call up the Signal Hill PD and ask before riding my bike on Cherry again.

    Reply
  2. Barry
    Barry says:

    I think this blog is wrong about Lawndale. The language in LMC 10.10.090 is vague as it does not define which pedestrian walkways are designated by the city council.

    Reply

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. […] So far we’ve covered LA and environs, the Valley, the South Bay communities, and the Harbor Corridor. Today, we’re tackling sidewalk riding rules in the western San Gabriel Valley. The Rio […]

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