Three Foot Passing Bill Goes to the Governor’s Desk

The Three Foot Passing bill introduced by Assemblymember Steven Bradford (D-Gardena) passed the State Senate on August 26th. Today, it received a final vote in the Assembly, passing 51-23 at about 10:30am. It now heads to Governor Jerry Brown’s desk to be signed into law.

The bill states:

A driver of a motor vehicle shall not overtake or pass a bicycle proceeding in the same direction on a highway at a distance of less than three feet between any part of the motor vehicle and any part of the bicycle or its operator.

Similar legislation has been vetoed twice previously by Governor Brown, most recently in 2012. This legislation contains none of the issues he raised with previous “Three Foot” efforts, including provisions requiring drivers to slow down if they cannot pass with three feet of clearance and allowing drivers to cross the centerline to pass bicyclists. Those omissions notwithstanding, this legislation is a step forward in protecting all road users and should become law.

If you feel as strongly about this as we do, we ask that you contact the governor’s office to express your support for the Three Feet for Safety Act, and push for him to sign it into law.

York Boulevard Road Diet Traffic Safety Analysis

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Did implementing a road diet on York Boulevard make the street safer? Yes, it did! Photo credit: Walk Eagle Rock

When the LADOT proposes a road diet (also known as a roadway reconfiguration) on a street, it primarily does so with the intent of improving traffic safety. As it happens, road diets are frequently opportunities to specifically enhance conditions for people walking and bicycling – the most vulnerable users of our streets – while improving overall safety for all. After decades of study on the national level, road diets are officially acknowledged by the FHWA as a proven means to improve safety and the logistics of why road diets succeed in doing this  have previously been laid out on this blog. Read more

Summer Bicycle Safety Classes

Metro's Bike Map

Learn how to safely ride on streets with and without bicycle infrastructure

This summer Metro has been hosting a series of free bicycle traffic safety workshops funded through the Office of Traffic Safety. Metro is working with the LA County Bicycle Coalition, Bike San Gabriel Valley and Multi-Cultural Communities for Mobility in leading the two levels of workshops: a 3-hour beginner’s road rules class (in English and Spanish), and an 8-hour workshop for intermediate cyclists focusing on building traffic skills.

While the series began in June, there are still a few more classes available: Read more

AB 1371 – Three-Foot Passing Bill – Moves Forward to Senate Floor

GIVE ME 3's first official poster, at the bus stop at 1st & Main

“Give Me 3,” will it become a law this time?

Although two recent  attempts at passing legislation that would require motorists safely leave at least three feet of space when overtaking bicyclists have failed due to unclear language, advocates of such a law have not given up. Back in February, Assemblymember Steven Bradford introduced AB 1371, the latest iteration of a three-foot passing bill. AB 1371 sailed through an Assembly vote in May and yesterday it passed with the Senate Standing Committee on Transportation and Housing10-0. Next up is a vote on the Senate Floor, if you would like to see the bill move forward, contact your local Senator and let them know you support AB 1371.

Crenshaw Boulevard Streetscape Plan Workshops

Crenshaw Blvd Community Workshops

Click for full .pdf with details of the upcoming community workshops.

Be sure to join the Department of City Planning next week as the department hosts two community workshops for the Crenshaw Boulevard Streetscape Plan. The workshops will set the template for future streetscape enhancements, such as: street trees, street furniture, crosswalks, bike facilities and other features to encourage transit ridership and improve the quality of life in the neighborhood.

The Streetscape Plan, for those unaware, aims to make the Crenshaw Corridor a more pedestrian and bicycle-friendly place in tandem with the planned Crenshaw light-rail. The community workshops are an opportunity for the public to give feedback on preliminary proposed streetscape concepts. Below are the workshop dates and details:

Tuesday, June 25, 2013 (TODAY!!)

  • Time: 6pm–8pm
  • Location: Good Shepherd Church Auditorium, 3303 W. Vernon Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90008
  • Limited on-site parking.  Street parking available. Or get there via transit!

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

  • Time: 6pm-8pm
  • Location: West Angeles Villas Community Room, 6030 Crenshaw Blvd, Los Angeles, CA  90043
  • Street parking available. Or get there via transit!

Note: These are among a series of Community Workshops that will take place over the course of this 2-year planning effort– additional details and workshop dates can be found over at the Los Angeles Transit Neighborhood Plans website as they are made available. 

For any questions about the project or upcoming workshops, please feel free to contact Patricia Diefenderfer or Andre Parvenu of the Department of City Planning.

This next CicLAvia’s Made For Walking

On June 23rd pedestrians will rule Wilshire Boulevard

Quick update: LA2B did a great post about next week’s CicLAvia, as well. Check it out!

On June 23rd  CicLAvia will be back in town, this time with a new six mile east-west route that will run along Wilshire Boulevard between Downtown LA and Fairfax Avenue. Known as “Iconic Wilshire,” this route happens to be the most walkable CicLAvia yet for a handful of reasons:

The Hours Are Long – Previous CicLAvia’s have been held from 10am to 3pm but this one will be two hours longer, from 9am to 4pm (that means more time for walking and running).

It Is Rail Accessible – The Red, Blue, Expo, and Purple Lines all have stops along the route so getting there by transit, or some multi-modal combination,  will be a relatively easy.

The Route Is Short – At six miles long, one can easily enjoy much of the route through a leisure walk.

There Are Pedestrian Zones – The hubs at the ends of the Iconic Wilshire route will be pedestrian zones. CicLAvia obviously loves bikes but you’ll have to dismount to cover the entire route and get the full experience this time. Read more

Buffered bike lanes and pedestrian improvements approved for Colorado Blvd.

Colorado Boulevard Meeting - June 3

Councilmember Huizar begins Monday night’s community meeting; he later announced his support for the project, and highlighted the pedestrian improvements his office advocated for

On Monday, June 3rd, councilmember Huizar announced his support for the implementation of buffered bike lanes along Colorado Boulevard during a public meeting held at the Eagle Rock Center for the Arts. Staff at Council District 14 report over 200 people signed in at the entrance to the community event and about 80 stakeholders filled out speaker cards to voice their opinions regarding the specific design proposals. Feedback to the presented proposal was largely positive though some understandably expressed concerns over impact to peak-hour travel times. Several media outlets were in attendance, as well; the Eagle Rock Patch, Fox 11, LA Streetsblog, and The Eastsider LA have all provided coverage and commentary on the meeting. Read more

Bicycle Parking Ordinance Has Passed!

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Expect to see more of this!

The LADOT Bike Program is happy to report that the Los Angeles City Council has passed the long awaited Bicycle Parking Ordinance. This will mean improved bicycle parking standards citywide at commercial, industrial and residential-type locations. The ordinance includes a number of forward-thinking changes  including:

  • Formal definitions for different types of bike parking 
  • New standards for different types of bike racks including long-term and short-term bicycle parking
  • Improved standards for where bike racks are located on a property
  • Clearer  requirements for short-term and long-term bike parking.
  • New provisions allowing bike parking to be substituted for car parking for up to 20 percent of  the total automobile parking required for non-residential uses or up to 30% of the auto parking required near Transit Oriented Developments (TODs). Residential buildings will be able to swap up to 10% of their car parking, and if located within 1,500 feet of a transit facility, up to 15%. This exchange would occur at a rate of four bike parking spaces, per automobile space.
  • New standards requiring properties with  20 or more long-term bicycle parking spaces to also include 100 square feet of bicycle repair and maintenance space for residents and employees.
  • A Permitting process for allowing bike corrals to be installed in the public right of way.

Read more

LA River Bike Path Closure

Fit in as much bicycling along the LA River Bike Path as you can soon; the most northern portion will soon be closed for about four months.

The Bike Program was recently notified by Caltrans that a northern portion of the Los Angeles River Bike Path will be closed for approximately four months. This closure is occurring due to the Interstate 5 High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane widening project The detour will cover the Bike Path from just north of the Autry National Center to where Riverside Dr crosses over Hwy 134. There may also be additional closures in other portions of the bike path as needed for construction.

As the start date for construction has yet to be determined, the bike path closure date has not been set. Official closure dates, as well as updates to construction and other possible closures, will be updated here. The first update will occur one week prior to the initial closure.

Read more

Council Action to Temporarily Close Mason Ave Bike Lane

This Friday, the Los Angeles City Council is likely to vote in favor of Council File 12-1525, which will require LADOT to close the bike lane on N. Mason Ave for a maximum of six months. The closure starts from Sesnon Blvd. in the North, and goes to Corbin Ave in the South (totaling approximately 0.95 miles), and will only affect the eastern lane (north-bound); the western side bike lane (south-bound) will remain open.

The reason behind this closure is due to the newly constructed Porter Ranch Community School, where LAUSD and the developer failed to account for and provide adequate parking facilities for parents and the drop off of students when the new school opened this year. In order to address concerns regarding pedestrian safety and vehicular congestion, the City plans to create interim parking along N. Mason Ave. This provisional parking unfortunately requires that the bike lane be merged with the motorized travel lane until more permanent on-street parking can be designed and installed; at that time, the N. Mason Ave bike lane will re-open, along with a permanent parking lane near the school, within a maximum closure of six (6) months. Signage will posted along the closure to inform cyclists and drivers alike that the lane will be used by all modes of transportation.

LADOT is currently working with Council District 12 to rectify the situation and address any impacts caused by the bike lane closure.

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