San Fernando Road Bike Path: Phase 2 Now Open!

Councilmember Felipe Fuentes leads the way

A new stretch of bike path on San Fernando Road is here! Last Thursday morning, Councilmember Felipe Fuentes of the Seventh District, City agencies, and community partners announced the installation of a new bike path on San Fernando Road from Branford Street to Wolfskill Street, opening the bike path for its inaugural ride.

LADOT General Manager Seleta Reynolds joined representatives from Metrolink, Metro and LAPD, along with local families and friends to check out the new installation.  Reynolds says, “This section of the San Fernando Road bike path increases opportunities for people to unplug and spend time with friends and family.  LADOT looks forward to working with our partners, city leaders, and the community to connect this system to the City of Burbank in the near future. ”

Councilmember Fuentes cuts ribbon with LADOT GM Seleta Reynolds.

This 2.75-mile segment of the path connects Angelenos to the existing San Fernando Bike Path. This addition is the second phase of the planned bike path that sits adjacent to San Fernando Road. Phase 1, completed in 2011, included 1.75 miles of bike lanes on San Fernando Road from Hubbard Street to Roxford Street.

LADOT Engineer Tina Backstrom says that the bike path is a challenging design, as it involves a lot of coordination and partnership with agencies like Metrolink and Metro.  The long-awaited Phase 2 improvements include lighting, striping, traffic signs, and landscaping. Metrolink also enhanced the safety of the Bike Path project by making railroad and traffic signal improvements. Specifically, the bike path design has taken the opportunity to upgrade all the pedestrian crossings that intersect with the railroad.  Backstrom says, “We’re looking at safety for everyone,” with the new path making things safer for people on bikes, walking, driving, or riding the train. Read more

Modernizing pilots, Arts District corral open for business

Good day LA!

Today was another great day for the great streets of Los Angeles! Corral designs were updated and onlookers watched as the long awaited Willow St. Bicycle Corral was installed in the booming Downtown Arts District.

First stop by the Bicycle Corral Fairy was a check up on our very first corral: the York Bl. pilot.  The York Corral, originally installed in February 2011 has seen its share of wear and tear.  After the implementation of many more Bicycle Corrals throughout the city, we have learned a few things from their design, removing redundant or incorrect signage, and replacing materials like asphalt islands with more durable rubber wheel stops.

Before: Bye bye asphalt island!

After: The new sleek York Corral

After the healthy refresh at York, the crew traveled to the Arts District where Blue Bottle Coffee customers got an eyeful (and earful) of Bike Corral installation with their morning coffee. The LADOT sign crew and our colleagues at the City’s General Services Department (GSD) installed the new Corral on Willow St. at Mateo next to the neighborhood’s premiere coffee shop and our awesome maintenance sponsor, Blue Bottle Coffee.

Councilmember Jose Huizar was happy to see the new corral, saying “As a long time supporter I’m proud to host the first bicycle corral in the City. LADOT’s new bike corral configuration draws from lessons learned piloted in my district. Thanks to Blue Bottle Coffee for partnering with the City to bring the Arts District its very own bike corral!” The Corral reallocates one auto on-street parking space for 14 spaces for people riding their bicycles.

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Bike Program Stickers and Spoke Cards Coming to an Outreach Event Near You!

Karina Macias, LADOT Bike Program Graphics Guru

2014 is a big year for the LADOT Bike Program identity!  For the past 8 months we’ve been blessed with the ultra talented Karina Macias, our pro-bono consultant who designed new Bike Program stickers, spoke cards, and took the Bike Program graphic identity in an entirely new direction.  The Bike Blog took a moment to sit down with this graphics mastermind to get to the bottom of her brilliant design strategy.

Bike Blog: Why #BikeLA?

Karina: “We wanted to encourage a community, within social networking, of people who ride their bicycle in LA. [#BikeLA] would be the easiest way for bicyclists to share their ideas and stories.  This is the Bike Program’s way of identifying with them and building a community around bicycling.”

Bike Program Sticker by Karina Macias

Bike Blog: Why green?

Karina: “Bikes mean money… I mean, green is a comfortable color.  The Spring Street bike lanes are green and it makes bicyclists feel comfortable.”

Bike Blog: What about the spoke cards?  I see there’s a golden ticket…

Karina: “With the City of LA’s growing bikeways network, I felt this was the Bike Program’s way of giving bicyclists a golden ticket to a transportation network, to pedal powered transportation.”

This is your Golden Ticket!

Bike Blog: And the anatomy of a safe bike?

Karina: “That stems from my own ignorance of what a safe and well maintained bike should look like.  I wanted to share with everyone what I researched.”

Anatomy of a Safe Bike

Karina also designed a very handy spoke card that outlines the rules and regulations every Los Angeles bicyclist should know and carry on their bike.  The card includes both State and LA City bicycle laws.

Rules and Regulations Spoke Card side 1

Rules and Regulations Spoke Card side 2

We are so proud of these new promotional materials! Please stop by an outreach event soon to stock up on our fun, informational, and awesomely designed stickers and spoke cards!

And, if you want, you can follow Karina on Twitter! @kmacfromla

Sharing the road with Sharrows

Sharrows on Westholme Dr. in Los Angeles

A pair of sharrows on Westholme Dr. in Los Angeles

We’re excited to announce that LADOT crews will be installing approximately 20 miles of new shared-lane markings — or “sharrows” — in neighborhoods across the city.  Sharrows are intended to supplement the bicycle lane network in Los Angeles by:

  • Providing gap closures in the Class II (Bike Lane) network
  • Enhancing Class III (Bike Route) Bikeways- This includes future BFS facilities
  • Improving bicycling conditions on two-lane roadways with dashed centerlines

[googleapps domain=”docs” dir=”spreadsheet/pub” query=”key=0Ajc6_TCtpElwdDBySml1VlRVUlJCNE1DNThsUnVmUHc&single=true&gid=0&output=html&widget=true” width=”500″ height=”700″ /]
Click here to access or download the original spreadsheet

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Meet our updated online Bicycle Map and Bikeway Projects page!

The Bicycle Program has been working on an update to our Bikeways Map on BicycleLA.org. In addition to our regular updates that keep the Bikeways Map accurate as new bikeways are installed, we’ve recently added new features to make the map more user-friendly and informative than ever.

legend1

We’re using new colors to show the different bikeway types.

New Legend and Map Colors: Traditionally, the map has displayed all bikeways in Los Angeles, using different colors to distinguish between paths, lanes, routes, and sharrowed routes. Now, we’ve adjusted the old color scheme to make it easier for readers to distinguish between the different types of bikeways. Bicycle paths are shown in green, bicycle lanes in red, bicycle routes appear blue, sharrowed bicycle routes are a pink-magenta, and bicycle friendly streets are a light blue.

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7th Street status update

Credit: LADOT Bike Blog

This woman looked very happy to be riding on the newly extended 7th Street bicycle lanes (Credit: LADOT Bike Blog).

Last Friday, LADOT crews began the work of extending the bicycle lanes and road diet on West 7th Street into Downtown LA’s Financial District and Historic Core. Since this is such an exciting project that will form a major connection in the Downtown bikeway network, we wanted to provide an update on the work that’s been performed so far (as of Friday, November 1) and what still needs to be done. Read more

Browns Creek Bicycle Path undergoing major repaving

Demo 10-28-13

Much needed repair work is finally underway.

Exposed Root

One of the smaller exposed roots

Portions of the Browns Creek Bike Path are closed as the bicycle path undergoes major repair work. Most notably, the path will be receiving new paving. Currently, portions of the path are obstructed by large tree roots and broken pavement that render the path almost un-useable.The repair work will also include the addition of access gates. In the future, these gates will be used to restrict bicyclists, pedestrian and other trail users from accessing the path during heavy storms when the creek overflows the channel.

The Browns Creek Bike Path is a 1.4 mile muilti-use trail that runs along the concrete-lined Browns Creek. The bicycle path starts in Northern Chatsworth near Stoney Point Park and continues south to connect users to the Orange Line Bike Path at the Chatworth Metrolink Station.

This project will be completed in early February, when it is expected to reopen just in time for some nice spring and summer bicycling. Expect to see an update and some more pictures of the renovated path then.

A Big Thank You to the 2013 Los Angeles Bicycle and Pedestrian Count Volunteers

The LADOT Bicycle Program would like to thank the Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition (LACBC)Los Angeles Walks, and all the volunteers who helped with the 2013 Bicycle and Pedestrian Count. The results from your hard work will help us gain a better understanding of bicycling in Los Angeles. Bike count data helps planners to understand where people are bicycling, where infrastructure needs exist, who is bicycling and ultimately, helps us to better accommodate the needs of bicyclists in our community.

About the Bicycle and Pedestrian Count

The Los Angeles Bicycle and Pedestrian Count is a massive data collection effort that collects the number of people bicycling and walking at over 120 locations at 3 different times throughout a one week period. Counts occur during peak travel times from 7:00 to 9:00 a.m. and again that same day from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. A third count takes place on the following Saturday from 11:00 to 1:00 p.m. In 2011, the bike count effort recorded 15,000 bicyclists and 75,000 pedestrians. We’re excited to see the results of this year’s bike count and thankful for all the volunteers who make this effort possible. The LACBC, in partnership with Los Angeles Walks, helps to organize the counts, recruit volunteers and process the results. Check out the results from the 2011 counts in this publication about biking and walking in Los Angeles.

Coming Soon: More Bike Corrals!

The site of the soon-to-be installed bike corral in Atwater Village.

It seems so distant, but February 18th, 2011, just two and a half years ago, was when the city’s first bike corral was installed on York Boulevard in Northeast LA.

Getting the corral off the drawing board and onto the ground was a lengthy process, but ultimately the project was able to march ahead thanks to both local residents’ support and political will. The day the bike corral officially opened was rightfully celebrated as a great stride in the city’s efforts to become more bicycle friendly.

Shortly after the York Boulevard bike corral was installed, we released a bike corral application form to gauge interest for future potential bike corral locations. Approximately a year after the city’s inaugural corral was installed, a second was placed as part of the Sunset Triangle Plaza in Silver Lake. Read more

The Year of The Road Diet

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July’s Bike Plan Implementation Team meeting was packed!

At our most recent Bicycle Plan Implementation Team meeting, Bikeways Engineer Tim Fremaux briefly noted that the LADOT implemented a number of road diets in the past fiscal year. Although it was only mentioned in passing, after looking at the exact mileage, it turns out this is actually a big accomplishment. Of the 100 miles of bike lanes installed over the last fiscal year, 20.1 miles came in the form of road diets. This comes as particularly promising news from a traffic safety perspective in light of the great safety improvements recently observed on a section of York Boulevard that received a road diet in 2006. So let’s take a page from the SFMTA, and be proud of our road diets, and see exactly where these road diets are:

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